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Temporal Arteritis: don’t lose sight of the diagnosis

temporal arteritis

Temporal arteritis, also known as giant cell arteritis, is an inflammatory vasculitis of the small and medium arteries that originate from the aortic arch. It can also involve the larger arteries, including the ascending aorta. Given the potential for irreversible visual loss if not identified and treated promptly, this diagnosis remains extremely important from both a clinical and legal standpoint. Pathophysiology of...

Asymptomatic Hematuria

asymptomatic hematuria

Today’s clinical question/topic, that I will discuss, is how much blood in the urine is too much? What if it's asymptomatic hematuria? The short answer, to the question, is that it varies case by case. For an 18-year-old female, who is on her menstrual period, we would expect to see hematuria on a UA dip. A 41-year-old female, with a UTI, might...

Tackling low back pain

It’s a Monday morning and you open the electronic medical record to see a slew of patients scheduled with everyone’s favorite chief complaint: low back pain. As you scroll through your schedule, you begin risk stratifying patients by age, complaint, duration, and medical history. With more and more Americans becoming sedentary, back pain has become an epidemic, not dissimilar...

BRCA 1 and BRCA Cancer Risks

Today we will be discussing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the diagnosed patient.  We will talk about the recommended surveillance schedule, as well as what malignancies are associated with these mutations. Most women who are diagnosed, with breast or ovarian cancer, have a sporadic type of malignancy, as opposed to an inherited form of cancer. BRCA Gene Mutation Statistics While only around...

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Clinical Review

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder that is characterized by altered gastrointestinal habits and chronic abdominal discomfort. This condition is reportedly very underdiagnosed, but estimates indicate that 10 to 15% of the United States population may suffer from some form of irritable bowel syndrome. Many patients may be too embarrassed to discuss their symptoms; thus it is thought that this...

Colon Cancer Screening

Colon Cancer Screening

Many of you, as primary care providers, might know the difficulties that come along with colon cancer screening. Oftentimes, patients are fearful, and there might be flat-out refusal to proceed with screening. Today, we will discuss the options available for colon cancer screening, when to screen, follow up intervals for repeat procedures, and specific conditions which require different screening schedules. The...

Acute Prostatitis: A Clinical Review

Prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate gland, which is most commonly infectious in origin. Prostatitis may be acute or chronic, but this article will focus solely on acute prostatitis. Prostatitis is very common, accounting for approximately 2 million cases per year. It is more common in young males, ages 30 to 50 and those who are sexually active. The differential diagnosis...

The Truth about Pediatric Fever

It was my first week practicing medicine. I must admit, I was drowning. I did not feel prepared for family medicine. I felt like I did not know anything about how to practice as a clinician.I knew how to diagnose diseases, what tests to order to diagnose, and first-line treatments. However, I was struggling with laboratory results that had abnormal...

Herpes Zoster – Managing Your Patient’s Pain

What is Herpes Zoster The rash of herpes zoster is a manifestation of re-activated varicella zoster virus that impacts almost one million patients per year. It is characterized by a painful unilateral vesicular eruption within a specific dermatome. By definition, herpes zoster does not cross the midline. It additionally is accompanied by significant lancinating, burning neuritis and neuralgia that can bedebilitating....

Pediatric Obesity – This Will Affect Us All

Today we will be discussing a problem that has been running rampant throughout the United States without much thought. It affects all ages, sexes, and races, with the possibility to potentiate many long-lasting diseases. This problem is childhood obesity. Working with a child that is obese can be very challenging for a provider. This chronic disease often requires frequent office...