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Primary Care Medicine: A different kind of gate keeper

primary care medicine

Primary care medicine is often heralded as the “gate keeper” of medicine, meaning that when patients establish with a primary care provider, it is the PCPs role to order screening interventions and decide which patients need referral to specialists. For example, does every 27-year-old healthy male need a cardiology evaluation for palpitations? Does every “ugly duckling” mole need a...

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

eczema atopic dermatitis

This itchy, irritating, skin rash is something that walks through the doors of my family practice office multiple times weekly.  It affects infants all the way up to adults of all races.  Often, they won’t be the only one in the family who has or has had a rash similar to this. Today we will talk about the topic of...

Pheochromocytoma: An Elusive Diagnosis

Pheochromocytoma

A pheochromocytoma is a very rare endocrine tumor that usually arises from the adrenal medulla. Although it is a rare entity, it is commonly tested on exams and boards due to it’s classic presentation. It is a cause of secondary hypertension and remains an important exclusion in the patient with documented hypertension in whom a work up for secondary...

Ultimate Guide to the Dipstick

On the Medgeeks Facebook page, we had a post recently with questions on how to appropriately interpret in office urinalysis results.  I always thought that if one person has a question about a topic, then there are likely multiple others that could benefit from the information as well. Regardless if you’re a practicing clinician or a current student, this review...

Staying Motivated in Medicine

staying motivated in medicine

It’s Friday night, and you are finally free, after seeing 20 patients for the day, all of whom have multiple comorbidities, poorly controlled glucose, and a laundry list of complaints to question you about. You have some time to catch up on your own life. You call your parents on the 5 minute drive from the hospital to the...

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Today, we will discuss the well-known and concerning topic of deep venous thrombosis, which is under the umbrella term of venous thromboembolism.  VTE (venous thromboembolism) encompasses deep vein thromboses (DVT) and pulmonary embolisms (PE). In the general United States population, the incidence of a first DVT is around 100 per 100,000 persons per year.  This increases with aging population. About 66%...

Streptococcal Pharyngitis: 
A common Cause of Sore Throat

Group A Strep Infection

Pharyngitis, or inflammation of the posterior oropharynx, is a commonly encountered diagnosis both in primary care and urgent care. In the winter months, it is not uncommon for clinicians to see sore throat almost continually in the acute setting. Given the almost 30 million visits per year for sore throat, it is important for clinicians and students alike to...

Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines

cervical cancer screening guidelines

Today, we will be discussing another specific set of screening guidelines, for a type of cancer. A few weeks back we discussed colon cancer screening, today we will talk about cervical cancer screening guidelines. Just as with colon cancer, cervical cancer screening guidelines aid in the detection of early precancerous or early cancerous changes, before malignancy or more severe malignancy...

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm 
Screening: A Clinical Review

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

An abdominal aortic aneurysm, by definition, is dilation of the abdominal aorta 1.5 its’ normal diameter. Most commonly, abdominal aortic aneurysm are uncovered incidentally through work up via CT or MRI scan for another condition. Guidelines exist for screening asymptomatic patients for AAA, which will be the focus of this article. The incidental finding of AAA presents an interesting...

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Today we will be discussing basal cell carcinoma.These are non-melanotic cancerous growths of the skin, that arise from the basal cells, in the lower dermis.Basal cell carcinomas require stroma surrounding them for support. Therefore, it makes them very difficult to metastasize by blood or lymphatic system. There are multiple classifications of basal cell carcinomas including nodular, cystic, pigmented, superficial, sclerosing...